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About the Patience...
Line drawing of a Cape George 38 The Patience is a heavy, full keel cutter. She is an ideal boat for two people, but comfortably accommodates up to four or five people. She has a v-berth in the bow, with a settee and pilot bunk in the main cabin. The head is on the starboard between the v-berth and main cabin. The galley, dining table and navigation station take up the remaining space in the main cabin. The nav station is large and you can view a full-size unfolded chart on the chart table. The engine room on the Patience is very roomy by sailboat standards. It occupies approximately the aft 10 feet of the vessel (in front of the lazarette) and uses the entire beam of the vessel. Due to the large engine room and nav station, the Patience has no quarter berth(s). My brother Sebastian is a little over 6 feet tall and I think he is pretty much able to stand upright in the Patience’s cabin.
We love the Patience and she has been a great boat for us. Despite this, Amy and I still have our wish list. All of the items on our wish list are related to the fact that we cruise primarily in the Northwest. True to popular conception, it rains a lot in the Northwest. If we were to buy or build another sailboat, it would have some type of covered helm station. Ideally, this would be a pilot-house of some type with a large bench or pilot berth nearby. I have spent many a wet day sitting with an itchy butt in the cockpit of the Patience standing watch. Not very fun. Our next boat will have a diesel forced air furnace. Almost every one of my father’s boats had this piece of equipment. They are awesome and really heat up and dry out a boat. We have tried both diesel and propane heaters (non-forced air) on the Patience. Both have advantages and disadvantages, but neither have done a very good job of really heating up and drying out the boat. After 3 or 4 days of non-stop rain, things can get pretty damp and cold below. Lastly, we would have a clothes dryer on the boat. Again, this was something my father put on almost all of his boats.
Below you will find more specific specifications on the Patience.

General
LOA:38 Feet (43 Feet including 5 foot bowsprit)
Type:Full Keel, Cutter Rig
Beam:11 Feet 9 Inches
Draft:6 Feet
Year Built:1986-1988
Gross Displacement:36,000 pounds
Ballast:Lead, 10,500 pounds
Hull Construction:FRP w/Balsa Insulation
Builder:Cecil Lang & Larry Alexander
Design:Cape George 38
Cruising Speed:5.5 Knots (under power)
Sails & Rigging
Sail Area:1,100 Square Feet
Stays & Shrouds:1 x 19 S/S Wire
Ground Tackle
Primary:66 Pound Bruce w/300 feet of 3/8 inch BBB Chain
Secondary:60 Pound Danforth w/50 feet of 3/8 inch BBB Chain & 250 feet of rode
Backup I:45 Pound CQR w/15 feet of Chain and 250 feet of nylon rode
Backup II:15 Pound Danforth
Backup III:15 Pound Danforth
Auxiliary Engine
Type:Mercedes/Nanni Conversion
Horsepower:72 HP
Number of Cylinders:4
Fuel Type:Diesel
Fuel Consumption:Just under 1 US Gallon per hour
Cruising RPMs:1900 RPMs
Electrical
Generator:Kabota 80 Amp DC Generator (Diesel)
Batteries:2 x 8D
Inverter:300 Watt Heart
Measurement System:Cruising Equipment Combination Amp/Volt Meter
Electronics
Autopilot:W-H P-3. Automhelm 3000 as backup
VHF::Icom, IC M-55 and Icom Handheld
Fathometer:Coastal Navigator, C star D
Ham Radio:Icom 735 and SGC SG-230 tuner
Radar:Furuno Model 1731 - 24 Mile
Tankage
Fuel:3 tanks - 80, 60 & 35 US Gallons. Total capacity 175 US gallons
Water:2 tanks - 110 & 45 US Gallons. Total capacity 155 US gallons
Waste:1 tank - Total capacity 40 US gallons
Safety Equipment
6 Man Beaufort Life Raft
Abandon Ship Bag—Handheld flares, parachute flares, handheld VHF & GPS, compass, high level chart, food, water, 121 Mhz EPIRB, etc.
First Aid Kit
Fire extinguishers
Mounted Whale Pump
7 Life Vests
Horseshow w/Strobe





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Adventures in the Charlottes was written by Tim Whelan.
All pictures and text ©Tim Whelan 1998-1999.
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